A Tsunami of Hunger Looms on the Horizon

A crisis is brewing and Carlos Rodriguez sees it in ever longer lines. “More work boots with plaster or paint on them,” he says. “Guys clearly coming in from the work site.”

A spokesperson for the Food Bank for New York City, Rodriguez has experienced tough times before, but not like this. “It takes a lot of pride for a New York construction worker to stand on the soup kitchen line. That’s something I never saw, even during 9/11, during that recession.”

The new working poor, as well as more families with young children, are threatening to overwhelm New York City’s last hunger safety net.

A crisis is brewing and Carlos Rodriguez sees it in ever longer lines. “More work boots with plaster or paint on them,” he says. “Guys clearly coming in from the work site.”

A spokesperson for the Food Bank for New York City, Rodriguez has experienced tough times before, but not like this. “It takes a lot of pride for a New York construction worker to stand on the soup kitchen line. That’s something I never saw, even during 9/11, during that recession.”

Here, on a quiet, tree-lined section of 116th Street in Manhattan, it’s possible to see the financial crisis that has the planet in its grip up close and personal. The new working poor, as well as more families with young children, are threatening to overwhelm New York City’s last hunger safety net.

And the hungry lining up on this street today may be only a harbinger of things to come. Behind them, in an increasingly hard-pressed city, a potential tsunami of need threatens to swamp the entire system. The one million-plus needy New Yorkers of today could, according to those experienced in feeding the poor, explode into tomorrow’s three million hungry mouths with nowhere else to turn.

Three million — and right in the heart of the country’s financial capital.

If this potential nightmare comes to be, it will be played out, in part, behind the nondescript storefront of the Food Bank’s Community Kitchen and Food Pantry of West Harlem and the more than 1,000 allied food pantries, soup kitchens, senior centers, low-income daycare centers, shelters and other partner programs spread across the city’s five boroughs.

In Harlem, in the late afternoon, the needy begin to congregate beneath a green awning that reads “Food Change”: hungry New Yorkers without other options, men and women, young and old, black, white, Asian, and Hispanic — a full spectrum of need.

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